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PRANG Spotlight - Staff Sgt. Eddie Rosario, 156th Security Forces Squadron

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Eddie Rosario, a combat arms instructor with the 156th Security Forces Squadron, poses for a portrait, July 12, 2021 at Muñiz Air National Guard Base, Puerto Rico Air National Guard. Rosario was selected as the July spotlight for his merits and performance as a security forces defender and a combat arms instructor. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Rafael D. Rosa)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Eddie Rosario, a combat arms instructor with the 156th Security Forces Squadron, poses for a portrait, July 12, 2021 at Muñiz Air National Guard Base, Puerto Rico Air National Guard. Rosario was selected as the July spotlight for his merits and performance as a security forces defender and a combat arms instructor. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Rafael D. Rosa)

MUÑIZ AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Puerto Rico --

Staff Sgt. Eddie Rosario, a combat arms instructor with the 156th Security Forces Squadron, here, is well known in the squadron for being the go-to guy. 

With eight years of military experience, Rosario maintains his requirements as a full-time security forces defender and excels as a combat arms instructor.

Last year, Rosario, along with the rest of the combat arms team, was tasked with ensuring all Puerto Rico Air National Guard Airmen, that required small arms qualification, were properly trained and qualified.  

“We scheduled classes, we had 50 Airmen in every class and held three to four classes per week, every month,” said Rosario. “So, doing the math, we probably trained over 800 Airmen.”

These classes include familiarization, safety and proper handling of small arms, such as the M4 carbine and the M9 pistol, before going to the range for qualification. 

“I like to explain things in a way that people can feel confident and can operate the weapon in a safe way. I also like to clarify all doubts,” said Rosario.  

A typical day as a combat arms instructor begins at 5 a.m. by reviewing daily tasks, followed by organizing and tracking the equipment that will be required throughout the training day. Then the classroom portion begins, next, it’s off to the range for qualifications and ends with weapons inventory and cleaning.

Even when presented with a long workday, Rosario says he really enjoys being an instructor.

“I know it’s my job, but I don’t see it as just a job, I could be at the range all day and wouldn't complain at all,” said Rosario. 

Rosario hopes to become a lead instructor in the future and will embrace the challenges and responsibilities that role entails by gaining experience now, so that one day he can fill those shoes. 

“By the way he’s going (Rosario), I’d say he’s going to end up taking care of this shop in the future,” said Master Sgt. Alfredo Gutierrez, the 156th SFS combat arms noncommissioned officer in charge. “I visualize him as one day becoming a supervisor.”